Parent Information

 

Parents, on this page you will find information about Quinton Elementary School.  This may include links/documents for registration, withdraw forms etc.  Additionally, PARCC information is available at your fingertips.  

Please check this page frequently, as more forms and PARCC information will be added as needed.

Please see attachments below about Quinton Township School District's PARCC Scores!



COMMON CORE INFORMATION LINKS FOR PARENTS                                                                                                                  

WEBINAR FOR PARENTS:                                                                

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/14/09/21/an-nj-spotlight-webinar-the-basics-of-the-common-core/

WHAT PARENTS NEED TO KNOW

http://www.corestandards.org/what-parents-should-know/



Attachment:
 What is PARCC?
 

UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETING PARCC ASSESSMENT RESULTS

http://www.parcconline.org/news-and-video/videos/understanding-the-score



ADDITIONAL PARCC INFORMATION 

http://bealearninghero.org


NJ ASK will only include the area of SCIENCE. This assessment will be administered across the state of New Jersey to students in grades 4 and 8.
 
What does the NJ ASK Measure?
The NJ ASK measures students’ proficiency of our state-adopted SCIENCE standards.
 
What is the purpose of this test?
 
At the school district level, the NJASK is utilized in conjunction with other internal measures for the purposes of:
  • Monitoring individual student's as well as cohort growth in response to curriculum and instruction.

At the state level:
  • monitoring school district's adherence to state SCIENCE mandated standards
  • monitoring individual student's as well as cohort growth in response to state SCIENCE standards, curriculum, and instruction.
Does my child have to participate in the test?
The NJASK assessment is mandated by the New Jersey State Department of Education (NJDOE) for all students in fourth and eighth grades.
 
How can I interpret my child's results?
"The total scores in Science are reported as scale scores with a range of 100 to 300. The scale score for Science is a total score based on a combination of correct answers to multiple-choice items and the number of points received for constructed-response items. Standard setting for grade 8 Science was conducted in 2000 and for grade 4 Science in 2005; raw cut scores were adopted at that time, and each subsequent test has been equated to that base year. The conversion algorithm ensures that the raw cut score for Proficient performance translates to a scale score of 200 and that the raw cut score for Advanced Proficient performance translates to a scale score of 250. The score ranges for the proficiency levels are as follows:
  • Advanced Proficient 250–300
  • Proficient 200–249
  • Partially Proficient 100–199
Partially Proficient is considered to be below the state minimum level of proficiency. Students at this proficiency level may need additional instructional support, which could be in the form of individual or programmatic intervention.
 
What is the validity of the test results?
 
"Scale scores. Individual Student Reports are provided to districts to help them evaluate student instructional needs. To an extent, students’ proficiency levels can inform school and district decisions regarding instructional support.
  • Scores indicative of Advanced Proficient performance reflect performance that has clearly met or exceeded state standards. It is rare for students falling in this range to be in need of instructional intervention.
  • Scores indicative of Proficient performance reflect performance that generally has met the state standards. 
  • Scores indicative of Partially Proficient performance reflect performance that has not met the state standards. Students falling into this range are most likely to be in need of instructional support, particulaly those lower in the range. 
What should parents do to ensure their child does his or her best work on the NJASK?

  • Ensure a restful night’s sleep;
  • Eat a healthy breakfast: stick to breakfast items that are normal for your child; eating a breakfast that is too large or rich often leads to upset stomachs;
  • Reduce anxiety about the test: assure your child(ren) they are well-prepared; take care not to overemphasize the test;
  • Arrive at school on time: students that are even a few minutes late may miss the start of a testing session and be required to make-up that session at a later date and time;
  • Avoid absences:  please be sure that all appointments, or other unnecessary reasons for tardiness or absences are carefully avoided; students who are able to take the test according to their regular schedule have the most appropriate testing experience.